Tutorials

 

The Radar 2018 Organising Committee invite you to participate in one of the many tutorials on offer at The International Conference on Radar 2018. All tutorials will take place on Monday 27 August 2018.

 

B1

A1

B3

B2

Session 1

(08:20- 10:20)

Introduction to Airborne Radar

Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar

Advanced Multistatic Passive Radar – from Detection to Imaging

Radar Clutter Modelling and Exploitation

Morning tea (10:20-10:40)

Session 2

(10:40-12:40)

Introduction to Airborne Radar

Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar

Advanced Multistatic Passive Radar – from Detection to Imaging

Radar Clutter Modelling and Exploitation

Lunch (12:40-13:20)

Session 3

(13:20 – 15:20)

Introduction to Airborne Radar

24 and 79 GHz Automotive Radar Systems and Applications

Air and Maritime Target Recognition: Dream, Theory and Practice

Radar, Phases-Arrays, Metamaterials, Cognitive-Radar and MIMO – Basics, Advances and Breakthroughs

Afternoon tea (15:20-15:40)

Session 4

(15:40-17:40)

Introduction to Airborne Radar

24 and 79 GHz Automotive Radar Systems and Applications

Air and Maritime Target Recognition: Dream, Theory and Practice

Radar, Phases-Arrays, Metamaterials, Cognitive-Radar and MIMO – Basics, Advances and Breakthroughs

Tutorial 1 - Introduction to Airborne Radar

This is a one-day (two tutorial sessions) introductory course covering all key aspects of airborne radar systems. Stimson’s book has been used over many years as the go to introductory text for students, engineers and technicians alike. This tutorial course is to be given by Professor Hugh Griffiths and Dr. Alessio Balleri. Hugh Griffiths is the lead author of the latest and substantially revised 3rd edition. It takes the form of a “taster” course, concentrating on the key underlying concepts that form the fundamentals of modern airborne radar system design. Whether attendees are new to radar or in need of a refresher of the basics, this course will help grasp the terminology, concepts, design-trades and applications of modern radar systems. The course closely follows the third edition of the book, providing an everlasting reference for attendees.

Room: B1
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 08:20 – 17:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$790.00
  Standard  A$990.00
  Student    A$390.00
Registration:  Click here to register
Catering: All day catering included

 

Prof. Hugh D. Griffiths

Prof. Hugh D. Griffiths holds the Thales/Royal Academy of Engineering Chair of RF Sensors at University College London, UK. Professor Griffiths served as President of the IEEE AES Society for 2012/13, is a member of the IEEE AES Radar Systems Panel, and is Editor-in-Chief of the IET Radar, Sonar and Navigation journal. He has won numerous awards including the 2017 IEEE Picard Medal and the 2013 IET A F Harvey Prize.

  

 Dr. Alessio Balleri

Dr Alessio Balleri is a Senior Lecturer with Cranfield University at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham. Dr Balleri has guest co-edited a special issue in “Biologically Inspired Radar and Sonar Systems” for the IET Radar, Sonar & Navigation in 2012 and a special Issue in “Emerging Radar Techniques” for the EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing in 2013. He was the technical programme committee co-chair for the IET International Radar Conference 2017.

Tutorial 2 - Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar

Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) is a technique used for reconstructing radar images of moving targets. Often, modern high-resolution radars implicitly offer the system requirements needed for implementing ISAR imaging. ISAR images can be obtained by means of a signal processing that can be enabled both on and off-line by using dedicated image formation algorithms. Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) systems are often based on the use of radar images because they provide a 2D e.m. map of the target reflectivity. Therefore, classification features that contain spatial information can be extracted and used to increase the performance of classifiers. The understanding of ISAR image formation is crucial for optimising ATR systems that are based on such images. In this tutorial, the basics of ISAR imaging will be introduced in terms of concepts, theoretical aspects, algorithms and applications. The last part of the tutorial will focus on modern ISAR imaging trends, such as bistatic, including passive, ISAR and 3D ISAR.

Room: A1
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 08:20 – 12:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$395.00
  Standard  A$495.00
  Student    A$195.00
Registration:  Click here to register
Catering: All day catering included

 

 Prof. Marco Martorella

 Prof. Marco Martorella received his Laurea degree (Bachelor+Masters) in Telecommunication Engineering in 1999 (cum laude) and his PhD in Remote Sensing in 2003, both at the University of Pisa. He is now an Associate Professor at the Department of Information Engineering of the University of Pisa where he lectures “Fundamentals of Radar” and “Digital Communications” and an external Professor at the University of Cape Town where he lectures “High Resolution and Imaging Radar” within the “Masters in Radar and Electronic Defence”. He is author of about 170 international journal and conference papers, three book chapters and a book entitled “Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging: Principles, Algorithms and Applications”. He has presented several tutorials at international radar conferences and organised a special issue on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar for the Journal of Applied Signal Processing. He is a member of the IET Radar Sonar and Navigation Editorial Board, a senior member of the IEEE and a member of AFCEA. He is currently the chair of the NATO-awarded research task group NATO SET-196 on “Multichannel/Multistatic radar imaging of non-cooperative targets” and co-chair of NATO SET-236 on “Robust compressive sensing techniques for radar and ESM applications”. He was also chair of the specialist meeting NATO SET-228 on “Radar Imaging for Target Identification”. He has been recipient of the 2008 Italy-Australia Award for young researchers, the 2010 Best Reviewer for the IEEE GRSL and the IEEE 2013 Fred Nathanson Memorial Radar Award. He is co-founder of a radar systems-related spin-off company, namely ECHOES. His research interests are mainly in the field of radar imaging and multichannel signal processing.

Tutorial 3 - 24 and 79 GHz Automotive Radar Systems and Applications

There are about 4000 fatalities on German streets every year, which are absolutely too many. Drivers have strong limitations in the ability to measure precisely the distance and the speed difference between cars, which is the reason for several accidents. The all-weather-capability as well as the capability of measuring target range and radial velocity simultaneously are some of the essential features, which make radar systems and small radar sensors suitable for automotive applications. The radar sensors are mounted behind the front and rear bumper in an invisible way. 

Radio Detection and Ranging (RADAR) is a worldwide well-known sensor technique since more than 114 years. Collision avoidance between ships was the first application for this new technique and technology. Today we come back to the collision avoidance application however now between cars in a normal road environment. 

The general requirement on an automotive radar sensor in the 24 and 79 GHz frequency domain is to measure the target range R and radial velocity vr simultaneously and unambiguously with high accuracy and resolution even in multi target situations, which is a matter of the appropriate waveform design. Several new waveforms have been developed for this application in the last years. In any continuous wave (CW) radar the receive signal is directly down-converted into baseband by the instantaneous transmit frequency. The receive signal is then sampled and further processed for target detection and parameter estimation. The resulting beat frequency fB will be measured with high accuracy by an FFT procedure. 

The aim of the tutorial is to introduce multiple CW waveforms with different frequency modulation schemes and describe their performance figures. With a single chirp waveform for example the target range and radial velocity cannot be measured in multiple target situations. Therefore several alternatives have been developed to fulfill the expected requirements. Chirp sequence waveforms show good performance figures in this respect. The computation complexity of the different waveforms will also be discussed. Hermann Rohling has presented tutorials on Waveform design and automotive radar systems at over more than 10 years. 

Room: A1
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 13:20 – 17:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$395.00
  Standard  A$495.00
  Student    A$195.00
Registration:  Click here to register
Catering: All day catering included

Prof. Dr. Hermann Rohling

 Prof. Dr. Hermann Rohling is the Head of the Institute of Telecommunications at Hamburg University of Technology, where he has developed an international reputation for mobile communications and automotive radar systems. Prof. Rohling has started his career at the AEG Research Institute, Ulm, Germany, as a researcher working in the area of digital signal processing for radar and communication applications. Nowadays his research interests include signal theory, radar waveform design, digital radar signal processing, CFAR detection (OS-CFAR), and estimation. But his research interest covers also wideband mobile communications based on multicarrier transmission techniques (OFDM) for future broadband systems (4G), and differential GPS for high precision navigation. He is a worldwide well-known expert in automotive radar systems for more than 20 years.

Prof. Rohling is the President of the German Institute of Navigation (DGON), a member of Informationstechnische Gesellschaft (ITG), and a Fellow of IEEE. Every year he is the organizer and chairman of the International Radar Symposium (IRS). Prof. Rohling was the Vice President of the Hamburg University of Technology, Germany for more than six years. 

Tutorial 4 - Radar Clutter Modelling and Exploitation

Clutter and the need to detect targets in clutter is a significant part of radar design.  The development of methods to model clutter and CFAR detection schemes for targets in clutter are still at the forefront of radar research, as evidenced by the numbers of papers on these topics in the radar journals and at the radar conferences.  Models of clutter are only of value if they can be used in practice for the development of real radar systems.   The tutorial will help attendees to understand the impact of clutter on radar design and performance, and how to use clutter models to develop better designs. This insight is relevant not only to radar systems engineers but also to those responsible for specifying and procuring new radar systems for operational use.

Room: B2
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 08:20 – 12:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$395.00
  Standard  A$495.00
  Student    A$195.00
Registration:  Click here to register
Catering: All day catering included

Dr. Luke Rosenberg

Dr. Luke Rosenberg received the Bachelor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 1999, the Masters in Signal and Information Processing in 2001 and the Ph.D. in 2007, all from the University of Adelaide, Australia. In 2016, he completed the Graduate Program in Scientific Leadership at the University of Melbourne, Australia.

He is currently a Discipline Lead for Maritime Airborne Radar in the Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia. His work covers the areas of radar image formation, adaptive filtering, detection theory, and radar and clutter modelling. He is an adjunct Senior Lecturer at the University of Adelaide, and in 2014 spent 12 months at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) working on algorithms for focusing moving scatterers in synthetic aperture radar imagery. Dr. Rosenberg has jointly received the best paper awards at international radar conferences in 2014 and 2015 and has presented a number of tutorials at the IEEE American (national) and international radar conferences. In 2016, he received the prestigious Defence Science and Technology Achievement Award for Science and Engineering Excellence and in 2017, the NRL ARPAD award with colleagues from the NRL.

Tutorial 5 - Air and Maritime Target Recognition: Dream, Theory and Practice

Radar Target recognition has long been an active area of research in radar, but little has been published about practical aspects and the actual results people achieve on large data sets, as opposed to simple academic examples. This tutorial provides a view of the techniques used to extract information about targets, and the level of classification performance one can expect to achieve, as well as providing a view of the considerations to take into account when designing target recognition modes (or even complete radars).

The tutorial is aimed at practicing radar engineers wanting to step into the field of NCTR as well as MSc and PhD students embarking on R&D activities within this domain.

Room: B3
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 13:20 – 17:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$395.00
  Standard  A$495.00
  Student    A$195.00
Registration:  Click here to register
Catering: Afternoon Tea Included

 

Willie Nel

Willie Nel  is a principal radar researcher at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in South Africa and also appointed in the role of Technology and Innovation Manager for the radar research group. He holds MSc in Digital Image Processing from the University of Cape Town and has been working passionately in the field of radar since 1999. His areas of expertise include radar system design, target recognition and imaging radar and radar signal processing. He has published several papers in the area of radar target recognition and imaging and acts as a reviewer for several radar journals and conferences. In 2015 he was technical chair of the IEEE radar conference when it was held in South Africa for the first time. He has recently been elected to serve on the IEEE AESS Radar Systems Panel.

 


Jacques Cilliers

Jacques Cilliers received his B.Eng. and M.Eng. degrees in electronic engineering from the University of Pretoria in 1994 and 2002 respectively. He has worked for Kentron, a division of Denel Aerospace, designing CFAR detectors for imaging infra-red air-to-air missiles and for the Laboratory for Advanced Engineering (LGI), affiliated with the University of Pretoria, developing high speed, spectrally efficient digital modulation techniques and digital equalization techniques. He has been employed by the Defence, Peace, Safety and Security (DPSS) operating unit of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pretoria, South Africa since 1999 as a Principal System Engineer and Signals/Systems Analyst in the field of Radar and Electronic Warfare. His research interests include adaptive signal processing, radar signal processing, array signal processing, MIMO radar, tracking radar, radar cross section (RCS) calculation, detection in sea clutter, clutter modelling, hardware in the loop (HIL) testing of radars and radar based target recognition.  He is currently completing a PhD at the University College of London (UCL) in the field of radar target recognition.

Tutorial 6 - Advanced Multistatic Passive Radar – from Detection to Imaging

The purpose of this tutorial is to provide a serious exposition of the state-of-the-art of bistatic and multistatic radar research and development. In this four-hour tutorial, we will impart a thorough technical overview of the current techniques and practices associated with bistatic and multistatic radar, and to progress beyond a rudimentary development of long established theories.

After an introduction to fundamental principles, geometry, and applications, the tutorial will move on to develop advanced topics. Passive bistatic radar will receive particular emphasis, given its civilian and defence relevance. The tutorial will focus particularly on advanced topics such as: (i) Passive radar imaging and (ii) Passive radar on moving platforms. In tutoring, the audience will receive a comprehensive treatment of interesting illuminators of opportunity such as FM radio, DVB-T2 and DVB-S/S2, advanced signal processing techniques to compensate for platform movement, analysis of the challenges associated with airborne passive radar, and a thorough grounding in passive SAR/ISAR and GMTI will be established. Over the past few years, the tutors have made contributions in the open literature on countermeasure techniques, inclusive of novel simulations and measurements.

In addition to constructing the theoretical narrative fundamental to the advanced pillar topics, a comprehensive set of results will be shown to illustrate concepts and to aid understanding. Auxiliary advanced topics related to the two pillars will also receive coverage in the tutorial.

Room: B3
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 08:20 – 12:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$395.00
  Standard  A$495.00
  Student    A$195.00
Registration:  Click here to register
Catering: All day catering included

Prof. Daniel W. O’Hagan

Prof. Daniel W. O’Hagan is the Head of the Passive Radar and Anti-Jamming Techniques Department (PSR) at Fraunhofer FHR. He is Associate Professor of Radar at the University of Cape Town (UCT). He has been lecturing full postgraduate (Masters and PhD) courses on radar systems and antenna array synthesis since 2014. Daniel has been delivering specialists lectures and workshops for several years, including the tutorial at the 2015 IEEE Radar Conference. In 2014, Daniel was funded by armasuisse to deliver his tutorial to a class of specialists. He has also delivered his tutorial material at the CCG in Germany. In 2012, Daniel presented his tutorial at Wright Patterson Air Force Base under the Window-on-Science initiative. Daniel is a regular lecturer at the Fraunhofer International Summer School on Radar and SAR. Daniel is the Chair of the full-status NATO group, SET-207. Daniel is the author of the chapter on Multistatic Radar Systems in the book Array, Radar and Communications Engineering. 

 

 

Dr Diego Cristallini

Dr Diego Cristallini is Head of the Passive Radar Group at Fraunhofer FHR. He graduated cum laude in Telecommunication Engineering in May 2006 and received the Ph.D. degree in Radar Remote Sensing in April 2010 both from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. From December 2009 to February 2015 he has been with the Array-based Radar Imaging Department of the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques FHR in Wachtberg, Germany. Since March 2015, Diego is leading the Team on Passive Covert Radar in the Passive Radar and Anti-Jamming Techniques Department of Fraunhofer FHR, Germany. Diego serves as voluntary Reviewer for a number of international technical journals, and he is active in the scientific community serving as TPC for several international conferences related to radar. He is also a regular lecturer at the Fraunhofer International Summer School on Radar and SAR. He received the Best Paper Award at EUSAR 2014 for his work on mono- and bi-static SAR-GMTI. Diego is the co-chair of the NATO group SET-242 on “Passive radars on moving platforms”. Diego is co-author of the chapter Bi- and monostatic GMTI in the book Novel Radar Techniques and Applications.

 

Prof. Piotr Samczynski

Prof. Piotr Samczynski received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electronics and Ph.D. and D.Sc. degrees in telecommunications, all from the Warsaw University of Technology (WUT), Warsaw, Poland in 2004, 2005, 2010 and 2013 respectively. Since 2010, he has been the Assistant Professor at the WUT; and since 2014 – a member of the WUT’s Faculty of Electronics and Information Technology Council. Prior to this, he was a research assistant at the Przemyslowy Instytut Telekomunikacji S.A. (PIT S.A.) (2010-2005) and the head of PIT’s Radar Signal Processing Department (2010-2009). 

Prof. Samczynski’s research interests are in the areas of radar signal processing, passive radar, synthetic aperture radar and digital signal processing. He is the author of over 170 scientific papers.  Prof. Samczynski was involved in several projects for the European Research Agency (EDA), Polish National Centre for Research and Development (NCBiR) and Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (MiNSW), including the projects on SAR, ISAR and passive radars. Since 2009 he has been a member of several research task groups under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, where he supports the research work in the fields of radar signal processing, modern passive and active radars architectures and noise radars.

Prof. Samczynski is a IEEE member since 2003, and IEEE Senior member since 2016. He is a member of IEEE AES, SP, and GRS Societies and since March 2017 Prof. Samczynski is a Chair of the Polish Chapter of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. He received IEEE Fred Nathanson Memorial Award for outstanding contribution to the field of passive radar imaging, including systems design, experimentation and algorithm development in 2017.

 

Prof. Mateusz Malanowski

Prof. Mateusz Malanowski received his M.Sc., Ph.D. and D.Sc. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland, in 2004, 2009 and 2013 respectively. He was a Research Scientist with FGAN (Forschungsgesellschaft fuer Angewandte Naturwissenschaften), Germany, and an Engineer with Orpal, Poland. Currently, he is an Associate Professor at the Warsaw University of Technology. Prof. Malanowski is the author/coauthor of over 160 scientific papers. His research interests are radar signal processing, target tracking, passive coherent location, synthetic aperture radar and noise radar. For the last 14 years he has been involved in numerous national and international projects, focusing on passive radar, synthetic aperture radar and noise radar. He has been a member of several NATO Science and Technology Organization groups. Prof. Malanowski is currently managing a project, whose aim is to develop first Polish, and one of the first in the world, operational military (TRL9) passive radar system.  Prof. Malanowski is a IEEE Senior Member and a member of Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Tutorial 7 - Marine target detection technique—challenges and solutions

This Tutorial has been cancelled. If you have registered for this tutorial please contact radar2018@arinex.com.au to discuss your options.

Detection of low-observable target in sea clutter is an important issue for both civilian and military applications, which is one of the key problems in the field of modern radars. Targets covered by sea clutter with low observability are main threats to future sea defense system and detection of these targets gives a severe challenge to radar survivability. Moreover, the detection process is difficult due to the weak radar returns and complex sea environment. Low-observable marine targets include low attitude, slow moving, small size, highly maneuvering, and stealthy targets. Their radar returns have a common characteristic, i.e., low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) in time and frequency domains.
This tutorial is based on the research and experiments of tutors over the past ten years, and has been presented at several international conferences. It coves sea clutter analysis, suppression, basic and advanced marine target detection techniques. Firstly, challenges of marine radar detection will be introduced including the challenges of sea clutter suppression, complex marine targets, and radar signal processing. Subsequently, we will give an overview of main detection techniques from the point of view of detection mechanism, signal modelling, energy integration, radar resolution, and processing domains. Then, this tutorial will give a deep discussion on the development and advances of marine target detection, i.e., long-time coherent integration, sparse time-frequency distribution, refined characteristics extraction and estimation via micro-Doppler, and machine learning for detection and classification. At the end of this tutorial, we will provide some real applications and examples of different radar platforms, i.e., shipborne, airborne, and multi-sensor fusion system. .

Room: B2
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 13:20 – 15:20
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$195.00
  Standard  A$245.00
  Student    A$100.00
Registration:  Click here to register
 Catering: Afternoon Tea Included
 
Tutorial 8 - Radar, Phases-Arrays, Metamaterials, Cognitive-Radar and MIMO – Basics, Advances and Breakthroughs

BASICS of Active Electronic Scanned Arrays (AESAs). RECENT SYSTEM DEVELOPMENTS: Patriot upgrade to 2016 state-of-the-art AESA; S-band AMDR AESA provides 30X sensitivity AEGIS SPY-1D(V). LOW COST PACKAGING: Raytheon, MIT-Lincoln-Lab., MA-COM, Rockwell Collins and South Korea developing low cost S and X-band flat panel AESAs using COTS, PCBs and commercial packaging. EXTREME MMIC: Whole 256 element phased array on single chip at 60 GHz. DIGITAL BEAM FORMING (DBF): Advantages of;  Israel, Thales, Australia and Lockheed Martin  (LM) AESAs have an A/D for every AESA receive element channel (172,000 for LM system); Raytheon developing element level mixer-less direct RF A/D reconfigurable between S and X-band in microseconds;  MOORE’S LAW; Potential future continuation of Moore’s Law: via Spintronics, Memristor, Graphene, Quantum Computing. FEW $ RADARS: For cars and wrist watch cell phones. Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Radar: Status and advantages detailed.

METAMATERIALS: low cost 2-D Electronically Steered Antennas for satellite internet communications (at 10-15 GHz); for cell towers, for cars and UAV radars; Stealthing by absorption and by cloaking; Army 250-505 MHZ conformal antenna to replace tall whip antenna. WIDEBAND LOW PROFILE ANTENNA: 20:1 bandwidth.

MIMO (MULTIPLE INPUT MULTIPLE OUTPUT): Explained in simple physical terms instead of with heavy math. Covered are performance, waveforms, signal processing load, ability to handle jamming. Contrary to what is claimed MIMO array radars do not provide 1, 2 or 3 orders of magnitude better resolution and accuracy than conventional array radars. Should not provide better GMTI than conventional radar. Show how conventional arrays can do as well. Where it makes sense to use MIMO is presented. Areas of future research outlined.

COGNITIVE ADAPTIVE ARRAY PROCESSING (CAAP): Applied to barrage, hot clutter and repeater jammers for conventional and MIMO systems. Enabled by DBF. Tremendous advantages over classical Sampled Matrix Inversion (SMI) adaptive processing detailed. Results derived through simple physical explanation rather than heavy math that does not give one physical insight into adaptive nulling. Show how CAAP re SMI reduces by several orders of magnitude the: 1) number of training sample needed, 2) the size of the interference matrix that needs to be inverted, and 3) the number and amount by which the adapted sidelobes are degraded. These results show clearly the power of CAAP. Using CAAP show that MIMO does not provide better rejection of barrage-noise-jammers, repeater-jammers or hot-clutter-jammers than conventional array radars. Areas for future research suggested.

QUANTUM RADAR: Uses entanglement to improve radar sensitivity. LOW COST PRINTED MICROWAVE ELECTRONICS: 1.6 GHz printed diodes achieved (goal 2.4 GHZ).  ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL SIGNALS ON SAME CHIP: Will allow data transfer at the speed of light.  BIODEGRADABLE ARRAYS OF TRANSISTORS OR LEDs: Imbedded under skin for detecting cancer or low glucose. NEW POLARIZATIONS — OAMs (Orbital Angular Momentum): why it has limited use.

Room: B2
Date: Monday 27 August 2018
Time: 13:20 – 17:40
Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre
Cost: Early Bird A$395.00
  Standard A$495.00
  Student A$195.00
Registration:  Click here to register
 Catering: Afternoon Tea Included

Dr. Eli Brookner

Dr. Eli Brookner: MEE & DrSc Columbia Un ’55 &’62; BEE CCNY, ’53. Raytheon 1962-2014 (retired) ; Principal Engineering Fellow; worked on radars for air traffic control, military defense, space & navigation: on ASDE-X, ASTOR RADARSAT II, AGBR, major Space Based Radar programs, NAVSPASUR, COBRA DANE, PAVE PAWS, MSR, COBRA JUDY Replacement, THAAD, SIVAM, SPY-3, Patriot, BMEWS, UEWR, SRP, Pathfinder, Upgrade for >70 ARSRs, AMDR, Space Fence, 3DELRR. Before Raytheon: Columbia Un Electronics Research Lab. [now RRI], Nicolet, & Rome AF Lab; Awards: IEEE 2006 Dennis J. Picard Medal for Radar Technology & Application; IEEE ’03 Warren White Award; Journal of Franklin Institute Premium Award best paper, 1966; IEEE Wheeler Prize for Best Applications Paper, 1998; RCA Armstrong Medal 2017; 2017 IEEE AESS Outstanding Organizational Leadership Award. Fellow: IEEE, AIAA, & MSS. 4 books: Tracking, Phased Arrays & Radar. >10,000 attended courses in 26 countries. Banquet & keynote speaker 13 times. > 230 publications. > 100 invited. 6 papers in Books of Reprints. 9 patent.

Tutorials will be held on Monday 27 August 2018. Minimum and maximum numbers apply to all Tutorials . Those Tutorials for which minimum numbers are not met may be cancelled and delegates will be notified via email. Tutorials will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

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